Brexit – The effects of Brexit on Employment in Ireland

Since the 2016 Referendum where the UK decided that they would leave the European Union, Brexit has become a household word. It has been almost 2 years; and on the 29th of March 2019 the UK are scheduled to leave the UK at 11pm.

But apart from how the UK will be affected by Brexit, the other focus is – how will Ireland be affected, as it is the only primarily English-speaking country left in the EU (positive 🙌)

Most importantly how will Brexit affect our jobs or career opportunities?!

According to a recent Employment Monitor, there has been a significant increase in professional opportunities available in Ireland (Morgan McKinley, 2018).

Brexit & the increasing compliance requirements of legislation (GDPR legislation) brought a large increase in activity in the Recruitment world in 2018.

Jobs like asset management, compliance, risk management and financial control are some areas which were affected in 2018 due to being associated with Brexit related activity. Another area which was very closely affected was Technology.

One of the most positive impacts for Ireland and Irish jobs include a likely increase in multinational businesses moving to Ireland from the UK. This is because, in comparison to the EU tax rate average of 19.71%, Ireland offers an attractive 12.5% corporate tax rate as well as a highly educated workforce.

As well as this, the uncertainty of BREXIT in the UK has given Ireland an advantage with European talent pools; as living and working in the UK will become increasingly difficult.

However, due to this influx, Employment and Irish Residence Permits have had a backlog – prolonging the process for overseas recruitment.

These delays mean that non-EA professionals who have come to Ireland with their visa and employment permit to live here, have had a delay in getting their interview with immigration for their residence permit meaning that they can’t get a multi-entry visa and are subsequently stuck here not working until they get their permit!

Although we have only seen the impeding effects which Brexit may have on Ireland over the last 6 months, the ‘’Real-Deal’’ will come into effect on the 29th of March this year.

Whether in the words of Noel Edmonds it’s a ‘Deal or No Deal’ situation, Irelands jobs market should and will benefit greatly from Brexit; with Dublin now being deemed as the next ‘Top Brexodus Destination’.

Studies show 21 out of 59 firms voted Dublin as the most popular choice for relocation (EY Brexit Tracker, 2018).

How will Brexit affect cross-border workers?

It is believed up to 23,000 -30,000 cross border workers (i.e.: live in one part of Ireland but work in another (the Common Travel Area (CTA)). This is mainly due to salaries being more attractive in the Republic of Ireland than in the North.

Cross border workers currently generate social insurance contributions in both NI and Ireland which can be combined in order to gain social security benefits and pension entitlements – which can also be exported to different EU states.

The December 2017 Joint report (EU & UK) protects the rights of workers who are already in cross-border employment. The thing is, it does not safeguard the rights of future cross-border workers (like upcoming graduates), and these assurances are not set in stone.

At present (pre-BREXIT), the EU Social Security Co-Ordination Rules protect the social security rights of workers seeking to move between two counties – once the countries are within the EU that is!

The UK/EU draft withdrawal agreement is set to include the EU Social Security Co-ordination Rules. This means that cross-border workers working in the Republic can declare their income in Northern Ireland; get access to tax credits, healthcare, social security benefits and be taxed by the UK government – during the transition period.

How will the negotiations affect the social security, tax & healthcare entitlements of cross-border workers post-Brexit (after the transition period)?

Post Brexit, the future of cross-border workers will be governed by the draft Political Declaration where social security coordination rules look unwelcoming for cross border workers, and future graduates!

The Declaration states that the parties:

“agree to consider addressing” social security coordination in the light of future movement of persons”

What will happen? Who know’s 🤷

Will the UK enter into a bilateral agreement to access the single market such as the model adopted by Switzerland….? Only time will tell!

How will Brexit affect graduates seeking employment in Ireland?


 As a result of Brexit; and Ireland’s great reputation in terms of attracting foreign direct investment (We have become one of the world’s leading destinations for finance, technology and pharmaceutical companies); new opportunities will be created, especially for graduates.

This will (hopefully) keep graduates on Irish soil with the increase in graduate programmes available!

Graduates within the Finance, Tech & Pharmaceutical industry, looking to gain employment with one of the Big 4 in the ‘’Big Smoke’’ i.e. Dublin, will have a bit of a competitive advantage when it comes to Brexit.

  • According to the IDA, more than a dozen global financial services firms have announced Ireland as the destination of their new European headquarters; with Dublin being the obvious option for London’s major banks (eg: Barclays)
  • Even in our wee county (Louth), WuXi Biologics announced their investment of €325m in developing a new manufacturing facility in Dundalk (the companies first site outside of China). Wasdell Group is also building a new pharmaceutical packaging plant in Dundalk.

Graduates nowadays are a lot more tech savvy with strong skills in technology and math; strong emotional intelligence, creativity and adaptability – transferrable skills that will make an impact on the workplace.

For companies to benefit from these skills and attract this pool of talented graduates, they will have to offer competitive packages and employment benefits, flexible working arrangements, and the opportunity for further training and development so that they can beat off the competition.

In the words of Albert Einstein ‘’In the middle of difficulty lies opportunity’’ and although there’s a strong element of complexity and uncertainty around Brexit in Ireland in particular; there looks to be area’s where Ireland will benefit and prosper from – After all, Ireland is now the bridging gap between the US and the EU!

Last night, Theresa May’s “withdrawal agreement” Brexit deal was roundly rejected by British MP’s (432 voting against the deal, 202 approving it) which is being called the worst political defeat in parliamentary history.

The most argumentative issue for British MP’s is “the Irish backstop” (the legally binding insurance policy ensuring there is no hard border between Ireland and Northern Ireland (no customs, no regulatory checks on goods passing between the two) for a 2 year transition period – leaving the UK aligned indefinitely to many EU laws.

The opposing Labour party (Jeremy Corbyn) has put forward a motion of no-confidence in Theresa Mays government; calling for a general election. Will there be a second referendum on Brexit?

The UK government now has 2 days to create a new plan of action.

EU officials have insisted that after lengthy negotiations and agreement with Theresa May last month, the current deal is their final offer.

The outcome of Brexit is up it the air; but what we do know at Recruit Island is this:

We have a wide range of jobs available from Healthcare, Nursing, Admin & Finance, Catering & Domestic Jobs, Construction & Engineering, Supply Chain Management, Academic, and more! We are ready to help you!

Contact Us Today!

Article Written By:

Lauren McLoughlin | Recruitment Consultant | Admin & Finance Division
DD: + 353 (0) 429368324
Email: [email protected]

Tips for Graduates: The Transition from Student to Career

A graduate is defined by the Oxford dictionary as “A person who has successfully completed a course of study or training, especially a person who has been awarded an undergraduate or first academic degree“. Starting your career as a graduate is a new beginning that many students look forward to. It is an exciting time as you leave the student life behind once and for all and take a step on to the career ladder. No more all-nighters to finish assignments, no more cramming months of study into weeks or even days and no more plain pasta and baked beans, well! Going from a graduate to the professional world can be a challenging time as routine and responsibilities kick in. It can be stressful as other graduates are looking for employment, increasing the competition and leaving companies choosing the best. Practice patience and don’t let knock-backs get you down. Aim high and read these tips for kick-starting your graduate career.

Find Your Niche

First, figure out what it is that you want to do. Make a list of things you want to change in the world, your skills, passions, motivations and goals. This will help you learn what kind of person you are and what you want to become. It will aid you in choosing a career that suits you. Ask friends and family for support and advice. Speak to people already working in the area you would like to try out and get advice from them, if you’re lucky you might even get some work experience.

Graduate Networking

Networking is extremely important and useful for graduates and future graduates. There are so many people in your network that can help you when it comes to your career – lecturers, classmates, peers, other students, friends and family. Talk to as many people as you can about your aspirations, you never know what advice or help you may receive. It can also be a good way to listen out for employment as most vacancies are filled by word of mouth and as the saying goes it’s not about what you know, it’s who you know. The more people you talk to, the more likely you are to pick up tips, learn and find opportunities.

Update Social Profiles

Ensure that your online presence is presentable. This is a must! Most employers will search for potential employees and it is important that you don’t make a bad impression. Keep yourself respectable on all social platforms and make sure you are using LinkedIn to its full potential. Network and search for companies and employers of interest etc. Include contact information such as phone numbers, e-mail address, all social media profile URL’s, company websites, blog web address etc. This will make it easy for an employer to research and contact you. And think before you post!

Your CV

Recruiters search for CVs on job websites when looking to fill vacancies and hire employees. Create a profile on job websites and upload a copy of your CV, it doesn’t take long to do and it means potential employers looking for the type of skills or qualifications you have can find you. Upload your CV to your LinkedIn profile as employers can use this to search for employees. Tailor your CV to individual jobs. When applying for a specific job role, you are essentially telling the employer why you are perfect for the position. It might be more time-consuming but changing your Cover Letter and CV for jobs will make you stand out more.

Volunteer

Volunteer for charitable organisations that you have an interest in. Get involved in new projects or new tasks whether it is in college, work or socially. The more experience you have and things you have done the more interesting you seem, the more you people you meet the more learn.

Skills & Experience

Most people will have work experience whether it is related to your graduate job/degree or not. Use your experience from previous jobs or the skills you have obtained through work life such as efficiency, working in a fast-paced environment, organisation and leadership etc. Don’t forget about college or voluntary experience. If you were involved in college projects or activities such as college radio or magazine make sure to include this and list the skills that you have gained from them.

Research the Company  

Make sure you do your research and know the company history and core values before going for an interview. It is important to know about the company because if you are questioned on it and you don’t know anything about it you can give off a bad impression and it show disinterest. It is also helpful when it comes to writing your cover letter and knowing which skills to enhance during the interview process.

Aim High

If there is a brand or company that you would love to work for then don’t be afraid to approach them. Do your history, research them and find out as much as you can. See if they have any vacancies. Find out who works for them and network with these people. Send them your CV or approach them directly. If you would like to work here then you more than likely have the skills and personality fitted to the company. It’s worth a shot.

Start a Blog

Sell yourself as well as your degree. A lot of the time, employers are looking for skills and personality. Use your strengths and make yourself stand out. Blog about things you know and are interested in or passionate about. You can share these on your LinkedIn profile.

No longer a Graduate – When you Get the Job

Ask Questions

Your employer can’t read your mind. They don’t expect you to know everything. If there are certain elements of the company or workload which you don’t understand, ask for clarification.

Stand out

Throw yourself into the work assigned and show your enthusiasm. Don’t wait for things to happen, make them happen. Get involved in important events and projects. Use your initiative to think and act independently. Speak up and voice your opinions and ideas.

Assess Yourself

Assess yourself regularly, set yourself some long-term career goals. Know your personality, your skills, your weaknesses. Be honest with yourself and improve on where you think you should. With appealing jobs being limited and those that are advertised getting snapped up quickly it can be tempting to apply for all sorts of jobs which might not appeal to you, just for the sake of finding a job. Think about what it is exactly that you are applying for. Do not apply for something which you have absolutely no interest in. You spend most of your time at work so choose something which you will enjoy, learn from and can grow in.

Work Hard

Even if you don’t love your job, do it well anyway. Every job is an opportunity and you must start somewhere. It’s OK if you feel that this is not the right job for you. It will give you a greater understanding of what you don’t want to do and what want from your career.

Making Mistakes

Making mistakes in your career is a lot different to making mistakes in college. When you make mistakes in college you might fail an assignment or subject. When you make mistakes in your job you learn lessons that you can grow from and take with you throughout your career.

Learn

Most great people did not get to where they are today on their own. They had a strong support system to help them on their way. Learn from your colleagues and if they give you advice, listen to them and take it on board. Chances are, they have a lot more experience than you, accept their help.

Update Skills

You never stop learning. Read books that are related to your job role, sign up for events or courses to update your skills. If you are passionate about it, this won’t even be work and you will enjoy it.

Now go and prosper! 😊

Prosper after graduating